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Competition is not training, which is not real-life

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Jim Glennon has a thought-provoking article on LawOfficer.com.

Think about what many officers do when it comes to range practice. They begrudgingly report to the range, take off their jackets, maybe their body-armor, stretch their arms, put on their “ears and eyes”, get themselves in the right frame of mind, maybe practice drawing and aiming, and then finally, when physically and mentally prepared they raise their hands and say “Ready.” Which is exactly how real gunfights happen.

I shoot USPSA and/or IDPA at least two times a month, and I've had over 200 hours of firearms training at this point in my life, and I was "Ready" for every single shot I sent down-range.

There's many good reasons why this happens, and safety is the biggest. Chaotic activity is the norm in a violent encounter, but chaotic activity on a shooting range tends to get people killed. This is where airsoft has been such a boon to "civilian" firearms training:, allowing us to safely use force-on-force training to practice and prepare as close as we can to the "real world".

If all you do is punch holes in a paper target, consider shooting IDPA or USPSA. If you compete, why not mix in some "tactical" courses to break you of the double tap habit? If you train, expand your horizons with some force-on-force or a friendly airsoft duel.

The life you save may be your own.

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